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What You Need to Know About Hair Transplantation

  • Robin UngerEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter describes the technique of hair transplant surgery and touches upon some of the more contentious debates in the field. Two harvest techniques, follicular unit excision (FUE) and strip/elliptical harvest, are described, and the pros and cons of each are discussed briefly. The design of the surgery in the recipient area should mimic nature, creating the illusion of density by producing a grade of hair density using grafts with different numbers of hairs and different densities of recipient sites. The most significant limitation continues to be the available source of donor hair, although this supply can be somewhat expanded with the use of a combination of techniques. The latest developments in hair transplant surgery enable skilled and experienced surgeons to consistently produce undetectable results.

Keywords

Hair transplant surgery Male pattern baldness (MPB) Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) Follicular unit excision (FUE) Safe donor area (SDA) Strip (elliptical) harvest Follicular unit transplantation (FUT) Female hair restoration Body hair transplantation (BHT) Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) Platelet-erythrocyte-rich plasma plus ACell (PeRP + ACell) Hair restoration 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of DermatologyNew YorkUSA

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