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An Integrated Understanding of University Internationalization Across Nations

  • Catherine Yuan Gao
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Global Higher Education book series (PSGHE)

Abstract

Drawing on the nation-based analysis of China, Singapore, and Australia, this chapter establishes a shared conceptual framework of university internationalization and outlines the critical generic dimensions and components of the phenomenon across individual cases. The framework established proves that university internationalization is not an intangible concept, but one that can be constructed. Constructing the phenomenon also is of great importance in developing measurements of university internationalization performance, and this framework served as the basis for selecting the indicators to do so. On the other hand, as internationalization is interpreted variously in different national and institutional contexts, it highlights the phenomenon’s dynamic nature. Because internationalization is a process, new elements may emerge in the future that need to be integrated into the conceptual framework.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Yuan Gao
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for International Research on EducationVictoria UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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