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Critical Care

  • Manpreet K. Virk
  • M. Hossein TcharmtchiEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Recognition and evaluation of a critically ill child can be challenging in a busy pediatric practice. A pediatrician is presented with a myriad of illnesses ranging from a simple viral infection to a life-threatening event. The index of suspicion for children must be maintained at high levels at all time regardless of the patient’s location: office, emergency room, urgent care, or inpatient. In this chapter, we will review the basics of the common critical illnesses in children.

Keywords

Acute respiratory distress syndrome Shock Brain death Submersion injury Increased intracranial pressure (ICP) 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PediatricsSection of Critical Care, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children’s HospitalHoustonUSA

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