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Emergency Medicine

  • Jo-Ann O. Nesiama
  • Jennifer McConnell
  • Kenneth YenEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the clinical presentation of common pediatric emergencies, with an emphasis on recognition, initial management steps, and stabilization. Topics discussed include respiratory distress, anaphylaxis, trauma, burn care, status epilepticus, altered mental status, poisoning and toxic exposure, foreign body aspiration or ingestion, diabetic ketoacidosis, concussions, hypertensive crisis, and drowning, as outlined by the 2017 American Board of Pediatrics Content Specifications. Also covered is the initial first hour of emergency care management of sepsis and shock.

Keywords

Respiratory distress Acute abdomen Anaphylaxis Trauma/burns Status epilepticus Altered mental status Poisoning/toxic exposure Foreign body aspiration/ingestion Diabetic ketoacidosis Concussion/head injury Hypertensive crisis Drowning Sepsis and shock 

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Suggested Reading

    Respiratory Distress

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    Acute Abdomen

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    Anaphylaxis

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    Trauma and Burns

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    Status Epilepticus

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    Altered Mental Status

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    Poisoning and Toxic Exposure

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    Foreign Body Aspiration and Ingestion

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    Diabetic Ketoacidosis

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    Concussion/Head Injury

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    Drowning

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    Hypertensive Crisis

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    Sepsis and Shock

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jo-Ann O. Nesiama
    • 1
  • Jennifer McConnell
    • 1
  • Kenneth Yen
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Department of PediatricsUT Southwestern Medical CenterDallasUSA

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