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Access to Social Security for Migrants in the European Union: Sedentarist Biases Between Citizenship, Residence and Claims for a Post-national Society

  • Marta Gionco
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter analyses the conditions to access social security for third-country nationals moving across European borders under the theories of sedentarism and post-nationalism. According to the concept of sedentarism, citizenship is a ‘right to have rights’. Post-nationalism, instead, claims that citizenship is an outdated concept and calls for societies to be organized beyond the nation-states. Through this chapter, both theoretical approaches will be tested upon the study of the conditions to access social security in the European Union, showing that in most legal systems access to social benefits is granted upon evidence of a certain degree of connection with the territory, usually in the form of prolonged legal residence or payment of a minimum of social security contributions. The last section of the chapter will analyse possible alternatives to sedentarism, with the purpose of overcoming the discriminatory effects of sedentary biases and ensuring the equal respect of every person’s human rights.

Keywords

Migration Borders Social security Citizenship European Union 

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Further Reading

  1. Carens, J. (2008). The rights of irregular migrants. Ethics & International Affairs, 22(2), 163–186.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Davidson, A., & Castles, S. (2000). Citizenship and migration: Globalization and the politics of belonging. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG and G. Giappichelli Editore 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marta Gionco
    • 1
  1. 1.OMCT – World Organisation Against TortureBrusselsBelgium

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