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Service Delivery Models

  • Anne M. Bowers
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

People with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD) will vary in the type and number of services required over the life course. Comprehensive service provision calls for a person-centered delivery approach to meet an array of needs including medical care, direct supports, community living, education, employment, social and leisure activities, and long-term care options. Comprehensive service provision is influenced by a variety of contextual factors, such as an individual’s health status and medical complexity, changing needs with age, and natural sources of support. Four conceptual models of service delivery are presented, each differing in terms of loci of control, mechanisms of coordination, and potential to support the self-determination of a service recipient. Although these model frameworks demonstrate a spectrum of possibilities for service delivery, improvement is still needed at the system level to increase the availability, accessibility, quality, and integration of comprehensive services for the I/DD population.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne M. Bowers
    • 1
  1. 1.National Council of State Boards of NursingChicagoUSA

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