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Curriculums

  • Hsu-Min ChiangEmail author
  • Kalli Kemp
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Learners with intellectual disabilities need effective instruction to cultivate their strength and to help them develop skills for independent living. Developing or adopting a curriculum that can address intervention goals is the foundation of an effective intervention. This chapter presents information regarding how to develop a curriculum to meet the needs of individuals with intellectual disabilities, demonstrates sample lesson plans, and compiles a list of existing curricula published within the last 20 years. Practitioners may find the information presented in this chapter useful for their clinical work.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of MacauTaipaChina
  2. 2.Educational ConsultantNew YorkUSA

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