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Neuropsychology

  • Graham M. L. Eglit
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

Neuropsychology is the study of brain-behavior relationships. A central focus of clinical neuropsychology is the characterization of cognitive phenotypes and the identification of the neurological basis of cognitive deficits in clinical populations. Persons with intellectual disabilities have problems in cognitive functioning. As the field of intellectual disability research has matured, overall generalized disabilities have been replaced by clinical models that identify much more specific and specialized disabilities in cognitive processing. As such, adoption of a neuropsychological approach to the study of intellectual disabilities has great potential. This chapter covers the rapidly emerging field of neuropsychology, current trends, and potential future developments. More specifically, this chapter describes the defining features of neuropsychology, essential methods used in neuropsychological research, different approaches to neuropsychological assessment, core domains of neurocognition evaluated in neuropsychological assessment, and promising emerging areas of research in neuropsychology.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Graham M. L. Eglit
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California San DiegoLa JollaUSA
  2. 2.Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on AgingUniversity of California San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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