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Performance Evaluation Criteria Based on Laws of Thermodynamics

  • Sujoy Kumar Saha
  • Hrishiraj Ranjan
  • Madhu Sruthi Emani
  • Anand Kumar Bharti
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Applied Sciences and Technology book series (BRIEFSAPPLSCIENCES)

Abstract

This chapter deals with works carried out by various researchers across the globe on performance evaluation criteria based on first law analysis and second law analysis. The importance of using proper criteria which considers both first law and second law analysis in order to evaluate the performance of augmentation techniques has been presented.

Keywords

Exergy analysis Entropy generation number Flow area goodness factor Volume goodness factor Frontal area Irreversibility distribution ratio 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sujoy Kumar Saha
    • 1
  • Hrishiraj Ranjan
    • 1
  • Madhu Sruthi Emani
    • 1
  • Anand Kumar Bharti
    • 1
  1. 1.Mechanical Engineering DepartmentIndian Institute of Engineering, Science and Technology, ShibpurHowrahIndia

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