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Satisfying Product Features of a Dementia Care Support Smartphone App and Potential Users’ Willingness to Pay: Web-Based Survey Among Older Adults

  • Robert Chauvet
  • Peter RascheEmail author
  • Zavier Berti
  • Matthias Wille
  • Laura Barton
  • Katharina Schäfer
  • Christina Bröhl
  • Sabine Theis
  • Christopher Brandl
  • Verena Nitsch
  • Alexander Mertens
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 957)

Abstract

Dementia is a large economic, social and health concern with the aging population. One of the best ways to care for people living with dementia is to keep them at home in a familiar environment. Smartphone applications may provide assistance to patients and caregivers. An open web-based survey was answered by 104 individuals older than 50 years. Participants rated eight features of a potential dementia care support app according to the Kano technique. Out of the eight product features investigated, six were positively associated with an application (wandering detection, weather and other threat detection, notifications and voice prompts, location sharing, emergency services contact, and medical records). The median for the amount people were willing to pay per month was 25$ (CanD) with a third quartile of 50$ (CanD). The results show which features should be included in an application to have maximum acceptance and usability and how much potential users are willing to pay on a monthly basis a dementia care support smartphone app.

Keywords

Health Dementia Kano technique Willingness to pay Older adults 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was conducted as part of the Undergraduate Research-Opportunity Program at RWTH Aachen University, Germany, in collaboration with the University of Alberta, Canada. This publication is part of the research project ‘TECH4AGE’, financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF, under Grant No. 16SV7111) and promoted by VDI/VDE Innovation + Technik GmbH. For more details and information, please see www.tech4age.de.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Chauvet
    • 1
  • Peter Rasche
    • 2
    Email author
  • Zavier Berti
    • 1
  • Matthias Wille
    • 2
  • Laura Barton
    • 2
  • Katharina Schäfer
    • 2
  • Christina Bröhl
    • 2
  • Sabine Theis
    • 2
  • Christopher Brandl
    • 2
  • Verena Nitsch
    • 2
  • Alexander Mertens
    • 2
  1. 1.University of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Institute of Industrial Engineering and ErgonomicsRWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany

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