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Why Does It Matter How Creative Writing Is Taught?

  • Zoe Charalambous
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Creativity and Culture book series (PASCC)

Abstract

Charalambous provides a comprehensive review of Creative Writing pedagogies to date with the objective of allowing the reader to consider the assumptions behind the Creative Writing courses they have been taught and pointing to the scarce qualitative research about students’ Creative Writing texts and Creative Writing exercises currently in the field. Three distinct strands in the literature of Creative Writing are discussed: Creative Writing in relation to Literature, to the self (or shift of self) and to research. The first section deals with the conceptual bases of Creative Writing, referring to its relationship to Romanticism, New Criticism, Theory and the workshop. Next follows an analytical account of the literary, the therapeutic, the political and the research conceptions of Creative Writing.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zoe Charalambous
    • 1
  1. 1.Independent ResearcherPanoramaGreece

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