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Centralized Versus Decentralized Structures in Appalachia

  • Edie West
Chapter

Abstract

The term ‘knowledge is power’ came to prominence as formal knowledge began to be linked with political clout and the people who created, transmitted and applied this knowledge became the formal agents of it. With growth in the magnitude and complexity of formal knowledge came the development of professional disciplines. These disciplines became institutions with political, socio-economic and cultural identities of their own as well as the driving forces, which provided education to its members within other, larger institutional settings. Institutions began to address the increasing number of areas of human life to which their particular brand of knowledge could be applied and with this shift in a tendency toward rule by public debate and participation in decision making toward a rule by the new ‘knowledge brokers’ (intellectuals) came the inevitable move away from egalitarianism toward a more intellectual monocracy [1].

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edie West
    • 1
  1. 1.Indiana University of PennsylvaniaIndianaUSA

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