Advertisement

Introduction

  • Linus Nnabuike Malu
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Compromise after Conflict book series (PSCAC)

Abstract

This chapter explains the rationale for the study, the research questions, the study’s analytical framework, and the nexus between international accountability and peace. It provides a brief outline of the establishment and challenges of the ICC, the major theories of punishment discussed in the book, the structure of the book, the doctrine of complementarity, the punishment provisions of the Rome Statute, the methodology of the study, the main findings of the study and some key terms like: peace, peace process, justice, and conflict transformation. It also highlights the tensions and challenges of deploying an international Court in national settings.

Keywords

International justice Peace processes International Criminal Court International accountability Conflict transformation 

References

  1. Akhavan, Payam. 2001. “Beyond Impunity: Can International Criminal Justice Prevent Future Atrocities?” The American Journal of International Law 95.7: 7–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Amann, Diane Marie. 2003. “Assessing the Criminal Adjudication of Human Rights Atrocities”. Third World Legal Studies 16: 169–181.Google Scholar
  3. Bjork, Christine and Juanita Goebertus. 2014. “Complementarity in Action: The Role of Civil Society and the ICC in Rule of Law Strengthening in Kenya”. Yale Human Rights Law and Development Journal 14: 205–230.Google Scholar
  4. Burgess, Heidi. 2004. “Peace Processes: What Are They?” Beyond Intractability. Accessed April 15, 2015. http://www.beyondintractability.org/essay/peace-processes.
  5. Clark, Janine. 2011. “Peace, Justice and the International Criminal Court”. Journal of International Criminal Justice 9: 521–545.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. De Vos, Christian, Sara Kendall, and Carten Stahn. 2015. “Introduction”. In Contested Justice: The Politics and Practice of International Criminal Court Interventions, edited by Christian de Vos, Sara Kendall, and Carten Stahn, 1–20. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Drumbl, Mark. 2007. Atrocity, Punishment and International Law. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Du Max, Plessis. 2010. The International Court Africa Wants. Pretoria: Institute for Security Studies, Pretoria.Google Scholar
  9. Faleti, Ademola. 2006. “Theories of Social Conflict”. In Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies in Africa: A Reader, edited by Shedrack Best, 35–60. Ibadan: Spectrum Books.Google Scholar
  10. Fletcher, Laurel and Harvey Weinstein. 2002. “Violence and Social Repair: Rethinking the Contributions of Justice to Reconciliation”. Human Rights Quarterly 24: 573–639.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Francis, David. 2006. Peace and Conflict Studies: An African Overview of Basic Concepts. In Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies in Africa: A Reader, edited by Shedrack Best. Ibadan: Spectrum Books.Google Scholar
  12. Freeland, Steven. 2010. “Effectiveness of International Criminal Justice.” Accessed September 20, 2015. http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/journals/ALRS/2008/16.html.
  13. Galtung, John. 1996. Peace by Peaceful Means. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  14. Goldston, James. 2016. “Three Lessons from the ICC’s Kenya Debacle. Open Society Foundation”. Open Society Foundation, April 6. Accessed April 15, 2016. https://medium.com/open-society-foundations/three-lessons-from-the-icc-s-kenyadebacle-515df408531b#.fs9dlxwre.
  15. Human Rights Watch. 2016. “To Consolidate This Peace of Ours.” Human Rights Watch Report. Accessed February 28, 2016. http://www.hrw.org/report/2015/12/08/consolidate-peace-ours/human-rights-agenda-cotedivoire.
  16. Ibeanu, Okechukwu. 2006. “Conceptualising Peace”. In Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies in Africa: A Reader, edited by Shedrack Best. Ibadan: Spectrum Books.Google Scholar
  17. International Centre for Transitional Justice. 2013 “Criminal Justice.” International Centre for Transitional Justice Briefing. Accessed May 10, 2013. http://www.ictj.org.
  18. International Crises Group. 2012. “Kenya: Impact of the ICC Proceedings.” International Crises Group: Policy Briefing, Africa Briefing No. 84. Accessed April 12, 2016. http://www.crisisgroup.org/en/regions/africa/horn-of-africa/kenya/b084kenya.
  19. Jenkins, Bert and Marty Branagan. 2014. “Introduction”. In Cultivating Peace, edited by Helen Ware, Bert Jerkins, Marty Branagan, and D.B. Subedi, 1–16. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
  20. Jurdi, Nidal Nabil. 2011. The International Criminal Court and National Courts: A Contentious Relationship. Surry: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  21. Kersten, Mark. 2014. “The ICC and Its Impact: More Known Unknowns”. Accessed December 24, 2014. https://justiceinconflict.org/2014/11/05/the-icc-and-its-impactmore-known-unknowns/.
  22. Ku, Julian and Jide Nzeribe. 2006. “Do International Criminal Tribunals Deter or Exacerbate Humanitarian Atrocities?” Washington University Law Review 84: 777–833.Google Scholar
  23. Ladan, Muhammed. 2010. “Immunity of Heads of State and the Jurisdiction of ICC Under the Rome Statute”. Accessed April 21, 2016. http://mtladan.blogspot.com.au/.
  24. Lederach, John Paul. 2003. The Little Book of Conflict Transformation. Intercourse, PA: Good Books.Google Scholar
  25. Lincoln, Jessica. 2011. Transitional Justice, Peace and Accountability. Oxon: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Malu, Linus. 2015. “The International Criminal Court and Conflict Transformation in Uganda: Views from the Field”. African Journal on Conflict Resolution 15: 81–102.Google Scholar
  27. Meijers, Tim and Marlies Glasius. 2013. “Expression of Justice or Political Trial? Discursive Battles in the Karadzic Case”. Human Right Quarterly 35: 720–752.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Mendez, Juan and Jeremy Kelly. 2015. “Peace Making, Justice and the ICC”. In Contested Justice: The Politics and Practice of International Criminal Court Interventions edited by Christian de Vos, Sara Kendall, and Carsten Stahn, 479–496. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Miall, Huge, Oliver Ramsbotham, and Tom Woodhouse. 1999. Contemporary Conflict Resolution. Cambridge: Polity.Google Scholar
  30. Moffett, Luke. 2014. Victims Before the International Criminal Court. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  31. Mueller, Sussane. 2014. “Kenya and the International Criminal Court: Politics, the Election and the Law”. Journal of East African Studies 8: 25–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Nouwen, Sarah. 2012. “The International Criminal Court: A Peacebuilder in Africa?” In Peacebuilding, Power, and Politics in Africa, edited by Devon Curtis and Gwinyayi Dzinesa, 171–192. Athens: Ohio University Press.Google Scholar
  33. Nouwen, Sarah. 2013. Complementarity in the Line of Fire: The Catalysing Effect of the International Criminal Court in Uganda and Sudan. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Plooy, G.M., ed. 1995. Introduction to Communication. Cape Town: Juta Academic. Google Scholar
  35. Ramcharan, Bertrand. 2009. “Peace Process”. In Post-conflict Peacebuilding: A Lexicon, edited by Vincent Chetail, 229–245. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Rawls, John. 1971. A Theory of Justice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Rigney, Sophie. 2014. “Unsettled Times at The Hague.” Accessed November 19, 2014. http://insidestory.org.au/unsettled-times-at-thehague.
  38. Roht-Arriaza, Naomi. 2006. “The New Landscape of Transitional Justice”. In Transitional Justice in the Twenty-First Century: Beyond Truth versus Justice, edited by Naomi Roht-Arriaza and Javier Mariezcurrena, 1–16. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Saunders, Harold. 2001. “Renegotiation and Circum-negotiation: Arenas of multilevel Peace Process”. In Turbulent Peace: The Challenges of Managing International Conflict, edited by Chester Croaker, Fen Hampson and Pamela Aall, 483–496. Washington, DC: United States Institute for Peace.Google Scholar
  40. Schabas, William. 2001. “International Law Responses to Conflict”. In Turbulent Peace: The Challenges of Managing International Conflict, edited by Chester Croaker, Fen Hampson and Pamela Aall, 603–618. Washington, DC: United States Institute for Peace.Google Scholar
  41. Schabas, William. 2007. An Introduction to the International Criminal Court. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Schabas, William. 2011. “Transitional Justice and the Norms of International Law”. Japanese Society of International Law, Kwansei Gakuin University. Accessed April 2, 2013.www.jsil.jp/annual_documents/2011.
  43. Schabas, Williams. 2012. Unimaginable Atrocities: Justice, Politics, and Rights at the War Crimes Tribunals. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Sikkink, Kathryn. 2011. The Justice Cascade: How Human Rights Prosecutions are Changing World Politics. New York: W.W. Norton.Google Scholar
  45. Teitel, Ruti. 2011. Humanity’s Law. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Turano, Laura. 2011. “The Gender Dimension of Transitional Justice”. New York University International Law and Politics 43:1045–1085.Google Scholar
  47. United Nations Development Program. 2011. “Strengthening the Rule of Law in Crisis-Affected and Fragile Situations”. Accessed June 2, 2015 http://www.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/crisis%20prevention/Global%20Programme%20Phase%20II%20-%20FINAL.pdf.
  48. Ware, Helen. 2014. “What Does the Person on the Street Corner Want? Growing Peace Through Democracy: Issues with Hybridity”. In Cultivating Peace, edited by Helen Ware, Bert Jerkins, Marty Branagan, and D.B. Subedi, 17–54. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.Google Scholar
  49. Wegner, Patrick. 2015. International Criminal Court in Ongoing Conflicts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Williams, Sarah. 2012. Hybrid and Internationalized Criminal Tribunals: Selected Jurisdictional Issues. Oregon: Hart Publishing.Google Scholar
  51. Wilmot, Amanda. 2006. “Designing Sampling Strategies for Qualitative Social Research: With Particular Reference to the Office for National Statistics’ Qualitative Respondent Register”. Accessed April 20, 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/qbank/QUest/2005/Paper23.pdf.
  52. Wippman, David. 1999. “Atrocities, Deterrence, and the Limits of International Justice”. Fordman International Law Journal 23: 473–488.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linus Nnabuike Malu
    • 1
  1. 1.International Law ConsultantArmidaleAustralia

Personalised recommendations