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Beyond Regime Change: The State and the Crisis of Governance in Post-2011 Egypt and Tunisia

  • Amr Adly
  • Hamza Meddeb
Chapter
Part of the Middle East Today book series (MIET)

Abstract

This chapter analyzes macro-political developments in Egypt and Tunisia since the 2011 revolutions in order to reconstruct the broader political context in which socio-economic protests have been unfolding. The chapter offers an account of the puzzling observation that incumbent governments in both countries, despite the different regime trajectories, have had a limited capacity to adopt economic reforms with distributional implications through authoritative state action. It argues that this incapacity transcends regime type because it is caused by more fundamental socio-political dynamics which relate to the socio-political coalitions on which social and political stabilization has depended. What explains the limited political capacity in both cases is the incumbent governments’ vulnerability vis-à-vis representatives of old distributional coalitions (including elements of both state-dependent labor and private business constituencies) whose support (or at least acquiescence) has been essential for post-revolution stabilization, either on a pluralist or on an authoritarian basis.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amr Adly
    • 1
  • Hamza Meddeb
    • 2
  1. 1.American University in Cairo (AUC)New Cairo CityEgypt
  2. 2.Mediterranean School of BusinessSouth Mediterranean UniversityTunisTunisia

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