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Introduction: Socioeconomic Protests in Times of Political Change—Studying Egypt and Tunisia from a Comparative Perspective

  • Irene Weipert-FennerEmail author
  • Jonas Wolff
Chapter
Part of the Middle East Today book series (MIET)

Abstract

This chapter presents the rationale and the topic of the book, the questions that are addressed, and the state of research on which it is based. It critically reflects upon the contentious politics approach as applied in the book, and elaborates the analytical framework that is used to systematically study socioeconomic contention in Egypt and Tunisia. It also gives a brief overview of socioeconomic contention in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) beyond Egypt and Tunisia and lays out the rationale and the limitations of the interregional comparison with Latin America. The chapter concludes with an overview of the contributions compiled in this volume.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Peace Research Institute FrankfurtFrankfurt am MainGermany

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