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Imagination and Film

  • Jonathan Gilmore
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter addresses the application of contemporary theories of the imagination—largely drawn from cognitive psychology—to our understanding of film. Topics include the role of the imagination in our learning what facts hold within a fictional film, including what characters’ motivations, beliefs, and feelings are; how our perceptual experience of a film explains our imaginative visualizing of its contents; how fictional scenarios in films generate certain affective and evaluative responses; and how such responses compare to those we have toward analogous circumstances in real life.

Keywords

Imagination Emotion Mood Simulation Cognitive psychology Seeing-in Make-believe Identification 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Gilmore
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Graduate CenterCity University of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Baruch CollegeCity University of New YorkNew YorkUSA

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