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Poststructuralism and Film

  • Robert Sinnerbrink
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter offers a critical discussion of the relationship between poststructuralism and film theory. I commence with a brief account of poststructuralism’s distinctive features (the critique of structuralist universalism, the championing of a philosophy of difference, and the shift from work to text). I then turn to the key poststructuralist thinkers such as Derrida and Deleuze, and explore why poststructuralist thinkers themselves may have eschewed reflecting on the medium. I then consider the critique of poststructuralist contribution to film theory, suggesting what elements of that critique remain pertinent. Finally, I consider Deleuze, the only poststructuralist thinker to have focused on cinema, and argue that much of his cinematic philosophy implies a critical distancing from the psycho-semiotic/poststructuralist approach to film theory.

Keywords

Deleuze Film theory Poststructuralism Structuralism 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Sinnerbrink
    • 1
  1. 1.Macquarie UniversitySydneyAustralia

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