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Shoulder Anatomy

  • Sümeyye Yılmaz
  • Tuğberk Vayısoğlu
  • Muhammed Ali Çolak
Chapter

Abstract

The shoulder is a complex structure which is comprised of various bones, joints, muscles, nerves, and vessels. It has the importance of being the only true connection between the axial skeleton and the upper extremity, and it plays the key role for upper extremity movements. In order to make the positioning of the upper extremity properly, all structures forming the shoulder must be intact and interoperate. Knowing the anatomy of the shoulder is essential for surgeons who want to evaluate the pathologies correctly and avoid the possible complications while performing surgical procedures. In this chapter, we will review the basic anatomy of the shoulder.

Keywords

Shoulder Humerus Scapula Clavicle Sternum Rotator cuff Brachial plexus Glenohumeral joint Anatomy Surgery 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to express our deepest gratitude to Dr. Huri, who has trusted us with such a great responsibility and provided us with this opportunity of partaking in this project. His patience and willingness to meticulously guide us throughout this project have been greatly appreciated. We would also like to thank Hasan Furkan Özkan and Ahmet Kasım Özkan, who have relentlessly drawn the images that we needed throughout the chapter.

Finally, we would like to thank HÜTBAT (Hacettepe University Medical School Scientific Research Organization) and its members for striving to promote scientific research among medical students with the aim of raising a new generation of physician researchers.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sümeyye Yılmaz
    • 1
  • Tuğberk Vayısoğlu
    • 1
  • Muhammed Ali Çolak
    • 1
  1. 1.Hacettepe University School of MedicineAnkaraTurkey

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