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The Father of the Forest: Identity Formation and Hemingway’s Naturalist Calling

  • Stephen Gilbert Brown
Chapter
Part of the American Literature Readings in the 21st Century book series (ALTC)

Abstract

Critical inquiry shifts from the mother-son and sibling-twin dyads to Hemingway’s troubled yet generative relationship with his father, Ed—assessing its implications for the development of his identity and art. The origins of Hemingway’s identity as a naturalist/frontier scout are traced to the influence of his father, and his father’s veneration of the naturalist Louis Agassiz. This inquiry serves as a springboard into analysis of a father figure’s influence: the naturalist Carl Akeley, as a corrective to this under-theorized aspect of Hemingway studies. Akeley’s influence is read through the critical lens of Donna Haraway’s “Teddy Bear Patriarchy” in Primate Visions.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Gilbert Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.University of NevadaLas VegasUSA

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