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Encouragement

  • Edward P. St. John
  • Feven Girmay
Chapter
Part of the Neighborhoods, Communities, and Urban Marginality book series (NCUM)

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors examine the role of postsecondary encouragement for improving students’ chances of success through community action. The research team examined a pilot project in two middle schools that provided mentoring, exploration of educational and career pathways, and civic engagement opportunities, practices similar to those used in Ireland and modeled after successful school-based projects in New York and other American cities. Interviews with students and mentors reveal how these mechanisms motivated students to aspire to attend college, demonstrating the potential for school-community partnerships in Detroit.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward P. St. John
    • 1
  • Feven Girmay
    • 2
  1. 1.Saint HelenaUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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