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Conclusion

  • Edward P. St. John
  • Feven Girmay
Chapter
Part of the Neighborhoods, Communities, and Urban Marginality book series (NCUM)

Abstract

In the conclusion (This chapter), the authors summarize insights from Detroit gained by using mixed methods and the community-based framework, before comparing the findings to other contexts. The authors then compare the Detroit school reform case to projects in New York City, New Orleans, and Washington, DC, American cities with more successful economies that also have low-income neighborhoods where children face risks undermining their educational success. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) trends on college participation illustrate the consequences of marginalizing low-income communities in the United States: the nation continued to fall behind the OECD average in college participation in the 2000s. In contrast, Ireland made substantial progress on college access compared to other OECD developed nations in the 2010s by going nationwide with programs serving low-income schools.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward P. St. John
    • 1
  • Feven Girmay
    • 2
  1. 1.Saint HelenaUSA
  2. 2.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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