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Role of Eco-friendly Cutting Fluids and Cooling Techniques in Machining

  • Kishor Kumar GajraniEmail author
  • Mamilla Ravi Sankar
Chapter
Part of the Materials Forming, Machining and Tribology book series (MFMT)

Abstract

Nowadays with growing pollution and contamination by hydrocarbon (petroleum) based cutting fluids, the scope for vegetable or synthetic biodegradable esters based eco-friendly cutting fluids is increasing. In this review work, the main focus is on sustainable machining using advanced cutting fluid application techniques with eco-friendly cutting fluids. Understanding the functions and various types of cutting fluids are critically important to maximize its performance during any machining process. Also, cutting fluid application techniques are equally important to minimize the use of cutting fluids for the desired machining processes. This review article focuses on the conventional cutting fluids, function of cutting fluids, ecological aspects of conventional cutting fluids, eco-friendly cutting fluids, cutting fluid application techniques during machining and their performances in order to establish the research field further. An overview of the role of eco-friendly cutting fluids and cooling techniques are discussed and finally concluding remarks and possible scope of future work is presented.

Keywords

Cutting fluids Cryogenic cooling Dry machining Eco-friendly cutting fluids Flood cooling Minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) Mist cooling Sustainable machining 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringIndian Institute of Technology GuwahatiGuwahatiIndia
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringIndian Institute of Technology TirupatiTirupatiIndia

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