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John Holt pp 1-16 | Cite as

Only the Experts Shall Speak or Be Heard

  • Adam DickersonEmail author
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Education book series (BRIEFSEDUCAT)

Abstract

John Holt (1923–85) was, during the 1960s and 1970s, the most famous radical critic of the US education system. His first book, How Children Fail (published in 1964) was a runaway best-seller.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.GundarooAustralia

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