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Memory of the World: An Introduction

  • Ray EdmondsonEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Heritage Studies book series (HEST)

Abstract

This chapter provides an introduction to the Memory of the World (MoW) Programme, briefly recounting some marker points in its history. It explains the different types of standard-setting normative instruments which govern the commitments and expectations of its Member States, including the particular instrument applying to MoW. In considering the rationale, philosophy, and character of MoW, it discusses the foundational concepts of documentary heritage and memory institutions. It describes the evolution of MoW’s vision, mission, and objectives, which focus on the preservation and accessibility of documentary heritage and the raising of awareness, including the strategy of developing public registers of significant documentary heritage. A concluding discussion on lost and missing heritage puts the current challenges of MoW into historical perspective.

Keywords

History Philosophy Principles Registers Guidelines 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.MOWCAP (Memory of the World Committee for Asia and the Pacific)CanberraAustralia

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