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Behavioral Health Services for Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

  • Marc J. TasséEmail author
  • Elizabeth A. Perkins
  • Tammy Jorgensen Smith
  • Richard Chapman
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), focusing on the importance of behavioral health professionals to be prepared to competently provide treatment to individuals with disabilities and to recognize individuals with IDD as a unique culture rather than a population that should be pathologized and treated with special care. The authors maintain that it is important for professionals to embrace this vibrant culture and become aware of the disability rights movement and how it affects the counseling relationship, that empowerment is a critical responsibility of behavioral health professionals, and that behavioral healthcare professionals need to work with individuals with disabilities and be willing to get involved in the self-advocacy movement.

Keywords

Intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) Epidemiology Substance abuse Customized employment Self-advocacy movement 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc J. Tassé
    • 1
    Email author
  • Elizabeth A. Perkins
    • 2
  • Tammy Jorgensen Smith
    • 3
  • Richard Chapman
    • 4
  1. 1.The Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA
  2. 2.Department of Child & Family Studies, College of Behavioral and Community SciencesUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  3. 3.College of Behavioral and Community SciencesUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA
  4. 4.University of South FloridaTampaUSA

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