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Intrathecal Drug Delivery: Indications, Risks, and Complications

  • Mark N. Malinowski
  • Nicholas Bremer
  • Chong H. Kim
  • Timothy R. Deer
Chapter

Abstract

Intrathecal drug delivery (IDD) is an effective means to treat refractory pain of malignant and nonmalignant origin. In 2017, Polyanalgesic Consensus Conference guidelines were published to provide the physician with best practices to identify patients, stratify risks, and initiate and maintain therapy. The successful use of IDD resides in the knowledge and ability of a physician to diagnose the underlying disease, stratify risks, initiate timely therapy, and identify and manage complications appropriately.

Keywords

Neuromodulation Intrathecal drug delivery Intrathecal opioids Intrathecal opiates Ziconotide Cancer pain Refractory pain 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark N. Malinowski
    • 1
  • Nicholas Bremer
    • 2
  • Chong H. Kim
    • 3
  • Timothy R. Deer
    • 4
  1. 1.Adena Regional Medical Center, Adena Spine CenterChillicotheUSA
  2. 2.Department of Anesthesiology and Pain MedicineColumbia University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.PM&R and Anesthesiology, Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  4. 4.The Spine and Nerve Centers of VirginiaCharlestonUSA

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