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Spinal Cord Stimulation

  • Adeepa Singh
  • Jason Pope
Chapter

Abstract

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) was introduced nearly 40 years ago and has since rapidly evolved, with expanding indications and with high-quality evidence to support its safety and efficacy. Spinal cord stimulation and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) therapies have become instrumental in the treatment of pain and are becoming increasingly employed earlier in the treatment algorithms for many disease processes, often in lieu of surgery or chronic opioid therapy.

Keywords

Spinal cord stimulation SCS Peripheral nerve stimulation PNS Peripheral neuropathy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adeepa Singh
    • 1
  • Jason Pope
    • 2
  1. 1.Montefiore Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Evolve Restorative CenterSanta RosaUSA

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