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Maternal Use of Some Groups of Drug with Common Side Effects and Infant Congenital Malformations

  • Bengt Källén
Chapter

Abstract

The idea behind this chapter is to see if drugs with perhaps quite different uses but sharing some effect or side-effect mechanism are characterized by teratogenic effects. Three such drug groups were studied: nitrosatable drugs, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, and drugs prolonging QT time. There was little evidence that nitrosatable drugs in general could cause malformations but some suggestions were found that secondary amines may have such a property. Drugs which are inhibiting dihydrofolate reductase showed no general teratogenicity but a doubling of the risk of orofacial clefts was noted which needs verification. Drugs which prolong QT time show no clear teratogenic activity.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bengt Källén
    • 1
  1. 1.Tornblad Institute for Comparative EmbryologyLund UniversityLundSweden

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