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The Americans Want to Stay

  • Bárbara K. Silva
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology book series (PSHST)

Abstract

This chapter examines how the Expedition remained longer than initially expected in Chile, and describes their progress in astronomical research. While explaining exactly what was the sidereal problem, we can understand the avant-garde questions they were posing. They were getting to know radial velocities, to analyze them, and to study binary stars. In their daily lives, whereas they measured the stars spectra, the astronomers were still constantly surprised with the odd habits of Chileans. They also decided to explore other areas of the country, and had an amazing adventure in the Atacama Desert, which decades later occupied a fundamental place in global astronomy. This chapter connects the adventure of the Lick Observatory astronomers with the current development of cutting edge, international astronomy in the Atacama region.

Keywords

Sidereal problem Binary stars Chilean society Atacama 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bárbara K. Silva
    • 1
  1. 1.Pontificia Universidad Católica de ChileSantiagoChile

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