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Cultivating Impartiality and Bodhicitta

  • Elise L. Chu
Chapter
Part of the Curriculum Studies Worldwide book series (CSWW)

Abstract

Bodhicitta is the aspiration to attain the highest spiritual goal of the omniscience of enlightenment for the liberation of all sentient beings; it requires the cultivation of impartiality. Without taking the antidote to partiality, our compassion and love will be discriminatory, and the result of our practices for consciousness transformation will be inferior. This chapter explores the concepts of impartiality and bodhicitta, and then, through the lens of the Buddhist Middle Way, discusses the philosophical differences between the axioms of equality and inequality as explicated by Rancière (On Ignorant Schoolmasters. In C. Bingham & G. Biesta (Eds.), Jacques Rancière: Education, Truth, Emancipation (pp. 1–24). London: Continuum Publishing Group, 2010). In contrast to the formulaic logic of the market and the language of global competitiveness that instigate social and educational planning inspired by the sheer desire to win, the altruistic motivation of bodhicitta provides us with an alternative logic for educational planning, teaching, learning, and studying, and for sustaining human life in a noble and dignified way.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elise L. Chu
    • 1
  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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