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Lighting Quality and Standards

  • Wout van Bommel
Chapter

Abstract

The quality of an interior lighting installation must be expressed by photometric values that influence visual performance, visual comfort and non-visual biological effects. The photometric parameters that can be used for specifying, designing and measuring the quality of interior lighting installations are summarised in this chapter. They range from parameters for illuminance level and illuminance uniformity, wall and ceiling luminance, glare restriction, three-dimensional object and face recognition, modelling, colour appearance and colour rendering. They are based on findings of the investigations described in Chaps.   2   8 . Some of these investigations are seen reflected in standards and recommendations. However, international standards and recommendations prepared by recognised lighting standardisation bodies that specify lighting from both the point of view of visual effects and non-visual biological effects (human-centric lighting) do not yet exist. This chapter describes standards and recommendations with an international character for lighting quality seen from a visual perception and visual comfort point of view, prepared by the International Lighting Commission CIE, the European Committee for Standardisation (CEN) and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wout van Bommel
    • 1
  1. 1.Van Bommel Lighting ConsultantNuenenThe Netherlands

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