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Community/Autonomy: Honor and Self-Respect

  • Marielle Risse
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter focuses on how the theoretical concepts of honor, self-respect, and self-control are interrelated in Gibali culture, for example, self-control is seen as equal to self-respect. Furthermore there is the necessity of putting others at ease while covering personal opinions and emotions, especially fear. Then there is a discussion about how Gibalis avoid and counter-act rude behavior from people who either do not know or prefer not to follow common understandings of appropriate behavior. The last sections discuss how self-control is taught and how the lack of self-control is punished.

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marielle Risse
    • 1
  1. 1.Dhofar UniversitySalalahOman

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