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Hand Function pp 263-277 | Cite as

Hand Function and Assistive Devices

  • Sonja KruppEmail author
  • Baptist Peltner
  • Rainer Zumhasch
Chapter

Abstract

Assistive devices play an important role for long-term prognosis of patients with functional problems of the hand. For patients to achieve independence from personnel support and pain reduction are the two reasons that are easiest to see and that motivate to use such devices. Another positive effect is protection of anatomical structures of the hand from (further) deterioration triggered by forces that occur during certain activities. After stroke involving the paretic hand into activities helps to take advantage of cerebral neuroplasticity and furthers rehabilitation. On the opposite, nonuse of a hand for whatever reason leads to reduction of cerebral representation and – as widely known – of muscle strength and joint flexibility. Immobilization must be limited to the necessary local and temporal extent and assistive devices can help to widen the field of activity. The chapter presents devices that are fully manufactured as well as easy and complex ways of individual adaptation.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Geriatric Research Group LübeckRed Cross Hospital Geriatric Center LübeckLübeckGermany
  2. 2.Occupational Therapy and Hand RehabilitationBad SchwartauGermany
  3. 3.Academy for Hand RehabilitationBad PyrmontGermany

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