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Performance Assessment of Anaerobic Digester from Various Locally Available Feedstock Materials and Catalysts

  • Vidyarani S. KshirsagarEmail author
  • Prashant M. Pawar
  • Sayaji T. Mehetre
  • Pakija Shaikh
  • Anil Shinde
Conference paper

Abstract

Anaerobic digestion is multi-functioning technology included under the renewable kind of energy source. Attention is required to increase the acceptability of this technology by the society. The lab scale batch types of experiments are performed to identify the biogas production capability of locally available raw materials. The performance of biogas can be increased by using a catalyst. The saw dust of Neem and Mahogany is used as a catalyst in anaerobic digester. The waste flower, root of tapioca plant, wheat straw, jawar straw and maize straw are used as a feed of digester. The acceptability of biogas technology can be increased in the society by providing the information about the use of locally available feed stock material and locally available catalyst to increase the gas production rate. This study provides information to increase the production of biogas and in turn the acceptability of biogas technology will increase in the society.

Keywords

Anaerobic digestion Biogas production Locally available feedstock materials Locally available catalyst 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vidyarani S. Kshirsagar
    • 1
    Email author
  • Prashant M. Pawar
    • 1
  • Sayaji T. Mehetre
    • 2
  • Pakija Shaikh
    • 1
  • Anil Shinde
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringSVERI’s College of EngineeringPandharpurIndia
  2. 2.Nuclear Agriculture and Biotechnology DivisionBhabha Atomic Research CenterMumbaiIndia

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