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Breast Disease pp 747-755 | Cite as

Reproductive Issues in Breast Cancer

  • Ercan Bastu
  • Faruk Buyru
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, our aim is to present associations between the risk of developing breast cancer and reproductive issues, breast cancer treatment and fetal effects during pregnancy, and finally evidence regarding the effect of breast cancer treatments on fertility and potential fertility preservation methods. Strong evidence regarding reproductive risks exists for hormone (estrogen and/or progesterone) receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancers. Specifically, plausible data in the literature suggest significant associations between HR-positive breast cancers and nulliparity, current hormone use, and age at first birth. If breast cancer is detected during pregnancy, termination of the pregnancy does not necessarily improve the cancer prognosis. Breast cancer during pregnancy must be managed with a multidisciplinary approach that should follow standard protocols for nonpregnant patients as much as possible while considering the safety of the fetus. Various assisted reproductive technology (ART) approaches are available for breast cancer patients who wish to preserve fertility after cancer treatment. These approaches can be utilized before or after the initiation of adjuvant breast cancer treatment. Hence, adequate counseling should be provided to premenopausal breast cancer patients prior to cancer treatment. If the patient wishes to preserve her fertility, her chances must be optimized by providing the most suitable ART treatment via a multidisciplinary approach.

Keywords

Reproduction Breast cancer Hormone receptor positive Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 protein Triple-negative breast cancer Parity Breastfeeding Menstruation Hormone use Ovulation induction Infertility Assisted reproductive technologies Fertility drugs In vitro fertilization In vitro maturation BRCA mutation Preimplantation genetic diagnosis Pregnancy Cytotoxic treatment Chemotherapy Radiotherapy Bisphosphonates Trastuzumab Bevacizumab Oocyte cryopreservation Oocyte tissue cryopreservation Embryo cryopreservation Fertility preservation Oncofertility 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ercan Bastu
    • 1
  • Faruk Buyru
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyIstanbul University School of MedicineIstanbulTurkey

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