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Approaches to Kinship in the Hungarian LGBTQ Community

  • Rita Béres-Deák
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life book series (PSFL)

Abstract

In this chapter, I will discuss how members of the LGBTQ community in Hungary think about family and kinship. This is often very different from the heteronormative definition of the state, which many of my respondents are critical of. However, the discourses they use to create their own interpretations make use of what David Schneider considers the main tenets of (Euro)-American kinship: blood connections and ‘diffuse, enduring solidarity’. By extending these to same-sex couples and rainbow families, however, my respondents queer traditional notions of kinship.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Rita Béres-Deák
    • 1
  1. 1.BudapestHungary

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