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The Family in (Post)Socialist Hungary

  • Rita Béres-Deák
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan Studies in Family and Intimate Life book series (PSFL)

Abstract

The definition of marriage in The Fundamental Law of Hungary highlights its heteronormativity and connection with the idea of the nation. However, all these elements show continuity since state socialism 3 or before. One of my goals in this chapter is to demonstrate that there is no rigid line between state socialism and its aftermath, especially with regard to practices and popular discourses. I examine some myths concerning the family in state socialism and then discuss the present situation, with special attention to the situation of LGBTQ people, in postsocialist countries, especially Hungary.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rita Béres-Deák
    • 1
  1. 1.BudapestHungary

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