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‘We live like prisoners in a camp’: Surveillance, Governance and Agency in a US Housing Project

  • Talja BloklandEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter uses a study of the everyday practices of residents of a housing project in the USA to challenge the understanding of these projects as either communal or hyper-ghettos. Situating such housing projects within wider socio-spatial forms of containment, oppression and urban marginality in the USA, the chapter uses residents’ ‘hidden transcripts’ to reveal gendered, racialized and class-based forms of social orientations. These are shaped by wider disciplining and stigmatizing urban processes but also create contexts and spaces for different behavioural responses.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Social SciencesHumboldt University of BerlinBerlinGermany

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