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Afghanistan Within the BRI Vision and the Feasibility of Enlarging the CPEC

  • Siegfried O. Wolf
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary South Asian Studies book series (CSAS)

Abstract

This chapter deals with the growing interaction between Beijing and Kabul and the proposal for the enlargement of the CPEC into Afghanistan. It elaborates on the current trajectories within Chinese-Afghan relations and sheds light on Beijing’s rising interests in Afghanistan. The underlying Chinese rationale regarding its western neighbourhood will be outlined. In this context, the chapter gives special attention to Afghan-Pakistan relations, the re-emergence of the Taliban and the role of both the US and India in the region. It will be argued that a potential CPEC enlargement into Afghanistan faces fundamental challenges. More concretely, the potential integration of Afghanistan into the larger Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) seems likely to worsen rather than to improve the conditions for the Afghan people. A major engagement of Beijing in Afghanistan within the BRI framework would most likely function as a source for conflict rather than stability and would further undermine regional cooperation.

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Siegfried O. Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.South Asia Democratic Forum (SADF)BrusselsBelgium

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