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The Conceptual Framework Regarding Economic Corridors

  • Siegfried O. Wolf
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary South Asian Studies book series (CSAS)

Abstract

This chapter originates from the premise that there is a lack of comprehensive conceptual work regarding Economic Corridors (ECs). Most existing studies were conducted by experts from both regional and spatial sciences guided by specific, compartmentalized research goals and interests. There lacks a concept of ECs offering a noteworthy explanatory value beyond strictly quantitative approaches—a concept capable of addressing the social and political impacts of a corridor project. It becomes obvious that a comprehensive approach to the very concept of EC is needed, not only so as to guide the formulation and implementation of such vast development initiatives but also so as to measure effectivity, efficiency and sustainability standards. In this context it is argued that an ‘EC initiative’ must consider a variety of dynamics, namely economic, organisational, institutional, behavioural, political, and planning characteristics. These characteristics determine the set of indicators constituting a conceptualization of ECs articulated in this chapter—and which should be understood as a heuristic tool meant to monitor and assess corridor initiatives. By offering a new concept for what constitutes an EC, the chapter aims to bridge the gap between the valuable groundwork undertaken by previous scholars and the conceptual requirements of a social science perspective.

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Siegfried O. Wolf
    • 1
  1. 1.South Asia Democratic Forum (SADF)BrusselsBelgium

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