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Testing for Causality in Data: Experiments

  • Christian Handke
  • Christian Herzog
Chapter

Abstract

Causal effects are a prime concern in media policy research, and experimental research designs are widely regarded as the most effective way to identify and gauge causality. Nevertheless, explicit applications of experimental methods are rare in media policy research. This chapter discusses experimental research designs in the context of this research area. It covers essential aspects of experimental research and identifies two types of experiments that are particularly suitable for media policy research: quasi-experiments and choice experiments. For each of these experiment types, we present a successful application. We discuss the benefits of experimental empirical work and some do’s and don’ts. Overall, we argue that an experimental mind-set can help to improve a broad range of empirical work on media policy, including qualitative research.

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Further Reading

  1. Arrow, K. J., & Solow, R. (1993). Report of the NOAA panel on contingent valuation. Washington, DC: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.Google Scholar
  2. Bateman, I. J., et al. (Eds.). (2002). Economic valuation with stated preference techniques: A manual. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.Google Scholar
  3. Grant, A. M., & Wall, T. D. (2009). The neglected science and art of quasi-experimentation: Why-to, when-to, and how-to advice for organizational researchers. Organizational Research Methods, 12, 653–686.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Shadish, W. R., Cook, T. D., & Campbell, D. T. (2002). Experimental and quasi-experimental designs for generalized causal interference. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christian Handke
    • 1
  • Christian Herzog
    • 1
  1. 1.Erasmus Research Centre for Media, Communication and Culture (ERMeCC)Erasmus Universiteit RotterdamRotterdamThe Netherlands

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