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Military Casualty Evacuation: MEDEVAC

  • Cord W. CunninghamEmail author
  • Donald E. Keen
  • Steven G. Schauer
  • Chetan U. Kharod
  • Robert A. De Lorenzo
Chapter

Abstract

Medical Evacuation (MEDEVAC) refers to all regulated casualty movement within the theater of operations. It is a critical element of ensuring life-saving care delivery to the wounded or critically ill from the point of injury to the nearest medical facility and between medical facilities at different levels of care. It is a complex, multifaceted mission that requires a combination of dedicated ground and air equipment and personnel that must be carefully coordinated with medical support units at every level. This chapter presents the history and current terminology used for MEDEVAC performed in the US Army. The guiding principles for contemporary MEDEVAC are detailed including the concepts of Roles of Care, precedence, and ongoing care approaches. Methods for documenting care before and during MEDEVAC and transferring patients to medical facilities are described. Finally, the ground vehicles and rotary-wing aircraft most commonly used by the US Army for MEDEVAC are described.

Keywords

Medical evacuation Casualty evacuation Tactical evacuation En route care 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cord W. Cunningham
    • 1
    Email author
  • Donald E. Keen
    • 2
  • Steven G. Schauer
    • 3
  • Chetan U. Kharod
    • 4
    • 5
  • Robert A. De Lorenzo
    • 6
  1. 1.LTC (P), MC, FS, DMO, USACritical Care Flight Paramedic Program, Center for Prehospital Medicine, Army Medical Department Center and School Health Readiness Center of Excellence, Joint Trauma System Committee on En Route Combat Casualty Care, DoD EMS & Disaster Medicine Fellowship SAUSHEC, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam HoustonSan AntonioUSA
  2. 2.MAJ, MC, FS, USA, Army Critical Care Flight Paramedic ProgramCenter for Pre-Hospital Medicine, U.S Army Medical Department Center and School, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam HoustonSan AntonioUSA
  3. 3.MAJ, MC, USAUS Army Institute of Surgical Research, San Antonio Military Medical Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam HoustonSan AntonioUSA
  4. 4.Col, USAF, MC, SFS (ret.), SAUSHEC Military EMS & Disaster Medicine FellowshipEmergency Medicine, Uniformed Services UniversityBethesdaUSA
  5. 5.Department of Emergency MedicineSan Antonio Military Medical Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam HoustonSan AntonioUSA
  6. 6.LTC, MC, FS, USA (ret.), Faculty Development, Department of Emergency MedicineUniversity of Texas Health Science Center at San AntonioSan AntonioUSA

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