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The Dutiful Son—Flaubert

  • Myron Tuman
Chapter

Abstract

Tuman looks at the life and love of Gustave Flaubert, a lifelong bachelor, who lived in his mother’s house till her death when he was fifty-two. Nearly all of his attachments were with older women, with the grandest and the longest lasting of these relationships forming the basis of his other great novel, Sentimental Education. Here too, as with so many adoring sons, the passion is almost entirely idealized, with only the barest physical contact between the two lovers.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Myron Tuman
    • 1
  1. 1.New OrleansUSA

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