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Crossing the (Trans)Gender Bridge: Exploring Intersex and Trans Bodies in Canadian Speculative Fiction

  • Evelyn Deshane
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Global Science Fiction book series (SGSF)

Abstract

This chapter analyzes two novels that explore the metaphor of the (trans)gender bridge, Kathleen Winter’s Annabel (2010) and Sybil Lamb’s I’ve Got a Time Bomb (2014). Trans and intersex people become the bridge, both in literary works and speculative fiction, as a way to anchor the transgender body to physical geography and national identity. These authors use the image of the bridge—more or less successfully, depending on their own gender orientation and their literary choices—to bridge communities, be it cis and trans, intersex, other queer, or geopolitical identities. The chapter argues that cisgendered appropriations of trans, intersex, and other identities is a problematic instance of (mis)representation.

Keywords

Kathleen Winter Annabel Sybil Lamb I’ve Got a Time Bomb Transgender Queer theory 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evelyn Deshane
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WaterlooWaterlooCanada

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