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Understanding Wellbeing

  • Kevin MooreEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter Moore considers the origins and diversity of wellbeing theories and research. The historical role of the discipline of psychology, he argues, was to adjust individuals to the new urban and industrial society emerging at the turn of the twentieth century, especially in American. That progressivist agenda set the stage for what was to become a proliferation of theories of wellbeing and interest in what makes people thrive. Moore reviews the emergence of Positive Psychology and the domination of the approach of ‘Subjective Well-Being’ in psychology. He documents debates around those efforts and the challenge of eudaimonistic understandings of wellbeing. The chapter finishes with Moore considering the contrast between a happy life and a meaningful one.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Environment, Society and DesignLincoln UniversityLincolnNew Zealand

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