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Case Study: The Power of Knowledge Alliances in Sustainable Tourism: The Case of TRIANGLE

  • Ulrich GunterEmail author
  • Bozana Zekan
Chapter
Part of the CSR, Sustainability, Ethics & Governance book series (CSEG)

Abstract

The present study tackles the criticism of practical application of sustainable tourism by focusing on the knowledge transfer among the various stakeholders. At the core of it is the project ‘Tourism Research Innovation and Next Generation Learning Experience’ (TRIANGLE) Knowledge Alliance, which serves as an example of an innovative best-practice approach within the sustainable tourism domain. Not only does the TRIANGLE Knowledge Alliance nicely operationalize Moscardo’s framework for education for sustainability (EfS) in tourism, but it is also a good example of involving a wide range of actors for shared value creation in a collaborative setting, thereby underlining the principles of transformative Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR 2.0).

Keywords

Knowledge transfer Knowledge alliance Corporate social responsibility (CSR) Transformative CSR (CSR 2.0) Sustainable tourism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Tourism and Service ManagementMODUL University ViennaViennaAustria

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