Advertisement

The Responsibility of the Destination: A Multi-stakeholder Approach for a Sustainable Tourism Development

  • Lukas PetersikEmail author
Chapter
Part of the CSR, Sustainability, Ethics & Governance book series (CSEG)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the presentation of the Destination Network Responsibility (DNR) concept. While Corporate Sustainability and Responsibility (CSR) refers to the individual responsibility of a tourism company, the Destination Network Responsibility describes the responsibility of a tourism destination network or the so-called “virtual service company”. It is analyzed and discussed to what extent the concept of CSR can be transferred from the company level to the network level of the destination and what conditions and processes are associated with it. Particular interest is given to the identification of the potentials that can result from a systematic network approach in a tourism destination. Besides, relevant fields of action and expected challenges in connection with the establishment and activation of a destination-wide network of responsibility will be worked out.

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Destination Networks Resilience Sustainability 

Literature

  1. Argandoña, A. (Eds.). (2010). Corporate social responsibility in the tourism industry: Some lessons from the Spanish experience. Working paper, WP-844; January 2010: IESE Business School, University of Navarra. http://www.iese.edu/research/pdfs/DI-0844-E.pdf [15.10.2017].
  2. Battaglia, M., Bianchi, L., Frey, M., & Iraldo, F. (2010). An innovative model to promote CSR among SMEs operating in industrial clusters: Evidence from an EU project. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, 17(3), 133–141.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Beritelli, P., Bieger, T., & Laesser, C. (2007). Destination governance: Using corporate governance theories as a foundation for effective destination management. Journal of Travel Research, 46(1), 96–107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Betz, K. (2010). Benchmarking corporate social responsibility: CSR is still new territory in the tourism industry. In R. Conrady & M. Buck (Eds.), Trends and issues in global tourism 2010 (pp. 117–119). Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bieger, T. (2002). Management von Destinationen (5th ed.). München: Oldenbourg.Google Scholar
  6. Bieger, T., & Beritelli, P. (2006). Management der virtuellen Dienstleistungskette -Sicherstellung einer Unternehmensübergreifenden Dienstleistungsqualität. In T. Bieger & P. Beritelli (Eds.), Dienstleistungsmanagement in Netzwerken: Wettbewerbsvorteile durch das Management des virtuellen Dienstleistungsunternehmens (pp. 1–12). Bern: Haupt.Google Scholar
  7. Bieger, T., Derungs, C., Riklin, T., & Widman, F. (2006). Das Konzept des integrierten Standortmanagements – Eine Einführung. In H. Pechlaner, E. Fischer, & E. Hammann (Eds.), Standortwettbewerb und Tourismus: Regionale Erfolgsstrategien (pp. 11–26). Berlin: ESV.Google Scholar
  8. Bode, A. (2010). Practical aspects of corporate social responsibility: Challenges and solutions. In R. Conrady & M. Buck (Eds.), Trends and issues in global tourism 2010 (pp. 93–99). Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Dwyer, L., Jago, L., Deery, M., & Fredline, L. (2007). Corporate responsibility as essential to sustainable tourism yield. Tourism Review International, 11(2), 155–166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. European Commission. (2011). A renewed EU strategy (2011–14) for Corporate Social Responsibility, COM (2011) 681, October 2011. http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:52011DC0681&from=DE [17.10.2017].
  11. Fifka, M. S. (2017). Strategische CSR-mangement im tourimus. In D. Lund-Durlacher, M. S. Fifka, & D. Reiser (Eds.), CSR und tourismus (pp. 3–16). Berlin: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Fischer, E. (2009). Das kompetenzorientierte Management der touristischen Destination: Identifikation und Entwicklung kooperativer Kernkompetenzen. Wiesbaden: Gabler.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Flagestad, A., & Hope, C. (2001). Strategic success in winter sports destinations: A sustainable value creation perspective. Tourism Management, 22(5), 445–461.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Habisch, A., & Schwarz, C. (2012). CSR als investition in human- und Sozialkapital. In A. Schneider & R. Schmidpeter (Eds.), Corporate Social Responsibility: Verantwortungsvolle Unternehmensführung in Theorie und Praxis (pp. 113–133). Berlin: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Hickman, L. (2007). The final call: Investigating who really pays for our holidays. Cornwall: Eden Project Books.Google Scholar
  16. Hinterhuber, H. H. (1996). Strategische Unternehmensführung 1: Strategisches Denken. Vision – Unternehmenspolitik – Strategie (6th Ed.). Berlin: de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  17. Kalisch, A. (2002). Corporate futures: Consultation on good practice. London: Social Responsibility in the Tourism Industry, Tourism Concern.Google Scholar
  18. Kleine-Koenig, C., & Schmidpeter, R. (2012). Gesellschaftliches Engagement von Unternehmen als Beitrag zur Regionalentwicklung. In: Schneider, A. & Schmidpeter, R. (Eds.), Corporate Social Responsibility: Verantwortungsvolle Unternehmensführung in Theorie und Praxis (pp. 681–700). Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  19. Lepoutre, J., & Heene, A. (2006). Investigating the impact of firm size on small business social responsibility: A critical review. Journal of Business Ethics, 67(3), 257–273.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Loew, T., & Braun, S. (2009). CSR-Handlungsfelder – Die Vielfalt verstehen. http://www.4sustainability.de/fileadmin/redakteur/Publikationen/Loew-Braun2009_CSR-Handlungsfelder-im-Vergleich.pdf [22.10.2017].
  21. Lund-Durlacher, D. (2012). CSR und nachhaltiger Tourismus. In A. Schneider & R. Schmidpeter (Eds.), Corporate Social Responsibility: Verantwortungsvolle Unternehmensführung in Theorie und Praxis (pp. 559–570). Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Lund-Durlacher, D., Fifka, M. S., & Reiser, D. (2017). Preface to the book. In: D. Lund-Durlacher, M. S. Fifka, & D. Reiser (Eds.), CSR und Tourismus (pp. VII–IX). Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  23. Oberholzer, K. (2012). Konkrete Ansätze zur Förderung einer regionalen CSR. In A. Schneider & R. Schmidpeter (Eds.), Corporate Social Responsibility: Verantwortungsvolle Unternehmensführung in Theorie und Praxis (pp. 701–708). Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Pechlaner, H., & Raich, F. (2006). Europa als touristisches Ziel. Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsgeographie, 50(2), 85.Google Scholar
  25. Pechlaner, H., Hammann, E., & Fischer, E. (2008a). Industrie und Tourismus: Herausforderung und Chance für die Standortentwicklung. In H. Pechlaner, E. Hammann, & E. Fischer (Eds.), Industrie und Tourismus: Innovatives Standortmanagement für Produkte und Dienstleistungen (pp. 11–43). Berlin: ESV.Google Scholar
  26. Pechlaner, H., Raich, F., & Fischer, E. (2008b). Management von Schnittstellen zu anderen Branchen als Basis eines integrierten Standortmanagements – Das Beispiel Tourismus und Bierwirtschaft in Bayern. In W. Freyer, M. Naumann, & A. Schuler (Eds.), Standortfaktor Tourismus und Wissenschaft: Herausforderungen und Chancen für Destinationen (pp. 25–39). Berlin: ESV.Google Scholar
  27. Pechlaner, H., Innerhofer, E., & Bachinger, M. (2010). Standortmanagement und Lebensqualität. In H. Pechlaner & M. Bachinger (Eds.), Lebensqualität und Standortattraktivität: Kultur, Mobilität und regionale Marken als Erfolgsfaktoren (pp. 13–34). Berlin: ESV.Google Scholar
  28. Pechlaner, H., & Bachinger, M. (2011). Netzwerke und regionale Kernkompetenzen: der Einfluss von Kooperationen auf die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit von Regionen. Regionen und Netzwerke (pp. 3–28). Wiesbaden: Gabler.Google Scholar
  29. Pechlaner, H., Fischer, E., & Bachinger, M. (Eds.). (2011). Kooperative Kernkompetenzen: Management von Netzwerken in Regionen und Destinationen. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  30. Pechlaner, H., & Doepfer, B. C. (2012). Werteorientierung und regionale Verantwortung in der Führung von KMU – eine empirische Analyse in der Region Ingolstadt. In: K. A. Kaltenbrunner, &. S. Urnik (Eds.), Unternehmensführung: State of the art und Entwicklungsperspektiven (pp. 100–111). München: Oldenbourg.Google Scholar
  31. Pechlaner, H., Volgger, M., & Herntrei, M. (2012). Destination management organizations as interface between destination governance and corporate governance. Anatolia, 23(2), 151–168.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Pechlaner, H., & Volgger, M. (2013). Towards a comprehensive view of tourism governance: Relationships between the corporate governance of tourism service firms and territorial governance. International Journal of Globalisation and Small Business, 5(1–2), 3–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Pechlaner, H., Beritelli, P., Pichler, S., Peters, M., & Scott, N. (Eds.). (2015). Contemporary Destination Governance: A Case Study Approach (Vol. 6). Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing.Google Scholar
  34. Petersik, L. (2012). Die Destination in der Verantwortung – Von Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) zu Destination Network Responsibility (DNR). Diploma Thesis at the Chair of Tourism, Catholic University of Eichstaett-Ingolstadt, Germany.Google Scholar
  35. Petersik, L., Pechlaner, H., & Zacher, D. (2017). Destination Network Responsibility (DNR) als Grundlage für regionale Resilienz. In D. Lund-Durlacher, M. S. Fifka, & D. Reiser (Eds.), CSR und Tourismus (pp. 315–332). Berlin: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Raich, M. (2008). Basic values and objectives regarding money: Implications for the management of customer relationships. International Journal of Bank Marketing, 26(1), 25–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Riess, B., & Schmidpeter, R. (Eds.). (2010). Verantwortungspartner. Unternehmen. Gestalten. Region: Ein Leitfaden zur Förderung und Vernetzung des gesellschaftlichen Engagements von Unternehmen in der Region. Gütersloh: Bertelsmann Stiftung.Google Scholar
  38. Rifai, T. (2012). CSR and Sustainability in the Global Tourism Sector—Best Practice Initiatives from the Public and Private Sector. In R. Conrady & M. Buck (Eds.), Trends and issues in global tourism 2012 (pp. 201–205). Berlin: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Schaer, T. (2008). Industrie und Tourismus: Eine vergleichende Standortanalyse. In H. Pechlaner, E. Hammann, & E. Fischer (Eds.), Industrie und Tourismus: Innovatives Standortmanagement für Produkte und Dienstleistungen (pp. 221–234). Berlin: ESV.Google Scholar
  40. Scherer, R. (2005). Lernende Regionen – Synergien zwischen Standortmarketing, Wirtschaftsförderung und Tourismusmarketing. In H. Pechlaner, T. Bieger, & T. Bausch (Eds.), Erfolgskonzepte im Tourismus III: Regionalmarketing – Großveranstaltungen – Marktforschung (pp. 3–16). Wien: Linde.Google Scholar
  41. Schneider, A. (2012a). Reifegradmodell CSR—eine Begriffsklärung und -abgrenzung. In A. Schneider, & R. Schmidpeter (Eds.), Corporate Social Responsibility: Verantwortungsvolle Unternehmensführung in Theorie und Praxis (pp.17–38). Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer.Google Scholar
  42. Schneider, A. (2012b). CSR aus der KMU-Perspektive: die etwas andere Annäherung. In A. Schneider, & R. Schmidpeter (Hrsg.), Corporate Social Responsibility: Verantwortungsvolle Unternehmensführung in Theorie und Praxis (pp. 583–598). Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer.Google Scholar
  43. World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) (Eds.). (2002). Corporate social leadership in travel and tourism, London.Google Scholar
  44. Zacher, D., & Pechlaner, H. (2014). Regional food production and its effect on rural tourism development—The case of Bavarian Jura. Rural Tourism and Regional Development, Conference Proceedings, pp. 78–91. http://epublications.uef.fi/pub/urn_isbn_978-952-61-1662-4/urn_isbn_978-952-61-1662-4.pdf [19.10.2017].
  45. Zelger, J., & Oberprantacher, A. (2002). Processing of verbal data and knowledge representation by GABEK®-WinRelan®. Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung, 3(2).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.MunichGermany

Personalised recommendations