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Conclusion and Future Perspectives

  • Rama Kant Dubey
  • Vishal Tripathi
  • Ratna Prabha
  • Rajan Chaurasia
  • Dhananjaya Pratap Singh
  • Ch. Srinivasa Rao
  • Ali El-Keblawy
  • Purushothaman Chirakkuzhyil Abhilash
Chapter
Part of the SpringerBriefs in Environmental Science book series (BRIEFSENVIRONMENTAL)

Abstract

Harnessing the potential of the microbiome can provide cleaner and greener solutions to various environmental challenges. Globally, microbiome research is a continuously evolving field, with researchers aiming to explore the structural and functional characteristics of the microbiomes in various environmental compartments. Still, there are various system-level knowledge gaps in microbiome research. Therefore, unravelling the complex and dynamic microbial crosstalk in the soil system and the multitrophic interactions will certainly provide new impetus for harnessing the real potential of the soil microbiome for multipurpose environmental benefits.

Keywords

Environmental challenges Functional microbiome Knowledge gap Multitrophic interactions 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rama Kant Dubey
    • 1
  • Vishal Tripathi
    • 1
  • Ratna Prabha
    • 2
  • Rajan Chaurasia
    • 1
  • Dhananjaya Pratap Singh
    • 3
  • Ch. Srinivasa Rao
    • 4
  • Ali El-Keblawy
    • 5
  • Purushothaman Chirakkuzhyil Abhilash
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Environment & Sustainable DevelopmentBanaras Hindu UniversityVaranasiIndia
  2. 2.Chhattisgarh Swami Vivekananda Technical UniversityBhilaiIndia
  3. 3.ICAR-National Bureau of Agriculturally Important MicroorganismsMau Nath BhanjanIndia
  4. 4.National Academy of Agricultural Research ManagementHyderabadIndia
  5. 5.Department of Applied BiologyUniversity of SharjahSharjahUnited Arab Emirates

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