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The Integration of a Flow Model into a Stakeholder-Based Framework for Vaccine Supply Chain Design

  • Stef LemmensEmail author
  • Catherine Decouttere
  • Nico Vandaele
  • Mauro Bernuzzi
  • Kim De Boeck
  • Sherif Hassane
  • Stany Banzimana
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Logistics book series (LNLO)

Abstract

Many rigorous flow models have been developed to support the design of manufacturing supply chains. However, supply chains supportive of Access to Medicines (ATM), like vaccine supply chains, impose considerable additional challenges on this design process. The incorporation of a broader base of stakeholders delivers a balanced set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and substantially enhances the societal and human impact of the ATM supply chain service delivery. To evaluate such a set of KPIs, we emphasize the need of three distinct models: a flow model which relates the operational issues, a financial model which supports the financial side and finally a value model which considers the value-based or humanitarian aspects. These models are interconnected, dependent and together lead to a combination of KPIs against which the new design options or scenarios are evaluated. In this chapter we describe the flow model that covers the manufacturing part of a rotavirus vaccine supply chain and elaborate on how it is embedded in a stakeholder-based framework. We demonstrate the relevance of a vaccine manufacturer’s capacity utilization, total lead time and total supply chain stock as proposed technological or operational KPIs.

Notes

Acknowledgements

We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines Research Chair on Operations Management and Re-Design of Healthcare Supply Chains in Developing Countries to increase Access to Medicines. GLAXOSMITHKLINE, GSK and the GSK Logo are trademarks of the GSK group of companies and are used with the permission of GSK.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stef Lemmens
    • 1
    Email author
  • Catherine Decouttere
    • 1
  • Nico Vandaele
    • 1
  • Mauro Bernuzzi
    • 1
  • Kim De Boeck
    • 1
  • Sherif Hassane
    • 2
  • Stany Banzimana
    • 3
  1. 1.KU Leuven, Research Center for Operations ManagementLeuvenBelgium
  2. 2.Brentford, MiddlesexUK
  3. 3.College of Business and EconomicsUniversity of RwandaKigaliRwanda

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