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Literature and Technology

  • Jeneen Naji
  • Ganakumaran Subramaniam
  • Goodith WhiteEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter defines what electronic literature is and provides a wealth of examples and practical suggestions for creating different types—hypertext fiction, interactive fiction, cell phone novels, digital poetry, and virtual and augmented reality. The authors also explore the new affordances of electronic literature and the ways in which it democratises the production and consumption of literature, while acknowledging that access to digital literature may be currently privileged to particular groups.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeneen Naji
    • 1
  • Ganakumaran Subramaniam
    • 2
  • Goodith White
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Media StudiesNational University of Ireland, MaynoothMaynoothIreland
  2. 2.School of EducationUniversity of Nottingham Malaysia CampusSemenyihMalaysia
  3. 3.School of EducationUniversity of Nottingham Malaysia CampusSemenyihMalaysia

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